Venous Ulcers


 

Venous ulcers are leg ulcers caused by problems with blood flow (circulation) in your leg veins. Venous ulcers usually develop over a period of time, so you may not notice them at first.

Venous ulcers can happen to anyone but they are more common in people who have varicose veins or deep vein thrombosis. Venous ulcers are most often found on the inside of the lower leg, but they can occur on the top of your foot or ankle too.

Venous ulcers are common in people who sit for long periods of time without moving their legs, such as truck drivers or air travelers, or people who are confined to bed for a long time.

They can also happen if you have a condition that slows the flow of blood, such as congestive heart failure or sickle cell disease. Venous ulcers are different than pressure ulcers which develop due to long-term pressure on your skin.

Common Causes Include:

Surgery around the affected leg, including knee replacement surgery and hip replacement surgery.

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (blood clots in the lungs).

Prevention: Venous ulcers can be prevented by doing calf stretches before and after long periods of sitting. If you have a history of venous ulcers or varicose veins, avoid standing for long periods of time.

If you have had a venous ulcer in the past, talk to the Innovation medical team before having surgery around the affected leg, including knee replacement surgery and hip replacement surgery.

Venous ulcers can be created or made worse by these surgeries. Venous ulcers tend to form at the site of recent surgery on veins. Venous ulcers can also be created or made worse by other surgeries that affect your circulation, such as coronary artery bypass surgery.

Symptoms: Venous ulcers usually start out as a purple colored spot on the skin and then gradually turn to yellow. They are usually painless but may feel warm. Venous ulcers are different than pressure ulcers which develop due to long-term pressure on your skin. Venous ulcers can be caused by problems with blood flow, such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (blood clots in the lungs), and conditions that affect blood flow like congestive heart failure and sickle cell disease.

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